Göteborgs Konserthus Sibelius, Price and Gomez

Event has already taken place. University of Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Henrik Schaefer conductor

Concert length: 2 h incl. intermission Scene: Stora salen
100 SEK Senior 60 SEK

Event has already taken place

The University of Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra offers music by Florence Price – the first Afro-American woman whose compositions were played by a symphony orchestra. Here we hear her first symphony written in the midst of the American depression in the 1930s.

We also hear the symphony that became Sibelius’s international breakthrough: the other. Here, the composer lifted the eyes of the ancient Finnish fairy tale world and the national epic Kalevala and instead directed it towards Europe and the present. With his optimistic and heroic tone, the work was exactly what many Finns longed for in times of Russian rule. Each sentence begins with a sharp chord that seems to say: Listen – now it begins!

The concert starts with the overture to the opera Il Guarany by Brazilian composer Antonia Carlos Gomez.

University of Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra

The core of the orchestra consists of the students at the two-year international master’s program in symphonic orchestra play at the University of Gothenburg’s School of Stage and Music. The training is unique in its kind and is conducted in collaboration with the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and the Gothenburg Opera.

The orchestra projects also include students from the master’s program in classical music – a three-year program where the student focuses on chamber music playing and individual development on his instrument. Sometimes students from other music colleges are invited to participate in and supplement the orchestra. The artistic director of the University of Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra is Henrik Schaefer.

Programme

Gomes OVERTURE TO 7 min

Florence Beatrice Smith Price (1887–1953), who settled in Chicago in 1927, was the most widely known African-American woman composer from the 1930s until her death. This edition presents two important unpublished orchestral works: the Symphony No. 1 in E Minor (1932) and the Symphony No. 3 in C Minor (1940). The style of these works is quite different. Price's symphony in E minor is squarely in the nationalist tradition, and it may be more fully considered in the context of the Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro Movement of the 1920s and 1930s. Cultural characteristics are borne out in the pentatonic themes, call-and-response procedurFlorence Beatrice Smith Price (1887–1953), who settled in Chicago in 1927, was the most widely known African-American woman composer from the 1930s until her death. This edition presents two important unpublished orchestral works: the Symphony No. 1 in E Minor (1932) and the Symphony No. 3 in C Minor (1940). The style of these works is quite different. Price's symphony in E minor is squarely in the nationalist tradition, and it may be more fully considered in the context of the Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro Movement of the 1920s and 1930s. Cultural characteristics are borne out in the pentatonic themes, call-and-response procedures, syncopated rhythms of the third movement's Juba dance, the preponderance of altered tones, and the timbral differentiation of instrumental choirs (the juxtaposition of the brass and woodwind choirs, for example). The symphony in C minor was inspired by new philosophical, political, and social currents, stemming from the Chicago Renaissance, underway from 1935 to 1950. The Great Migration of blacks from the south to Chicago, the Depression, and the adjustment to urban life provided vivid life experiences as subject matter for Chicago Renaissance writers and artists (including Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Margaret Bonds). Price's third symphony, which omits overtly black themes and simple dance rhythms, presents a modern approach to composition—a synthesis, rather than a retrospective view, of African-American life and culture.es, syncopated rhythms of the third movement's Juba dance, the preponderance of altered tones, and the timbral differentiation of instrumental choirs (the juxtaposition of the brass and woodwind choirs, for example). The symphony in C minor was inspired by new philosophical, political, and social currents, stemming from the Chicago Renaissance, underway from 1935 to 1950. The Great Migration of blacks from the south to Chicago, the Depression, and the adjustment to urban life provided vivid life experiences as subject matter for Chicago Renaissance writers and artists (including Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Margaret Bonds).

Intermission 25 min

Sibelius Symphony No 2 44 min

Participants

University of Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra

Henrik Schaefer conductor

Questions? Contact the ticket office